Art & Design

Holding My Own Hand

This week, I will be talking about extraordinary women in art. I thought it’ll be a great opportunity to highlight the women who’ve inspired me to dig deeper into art and my voice as an artist. Today, it’s all about Frida.

I was blessed to have an elementary school art teacher who loved culture. Her room was surrounded with posters and books of various artists and styles from all over the world. Naturally, I absorbed them all. One of the posters I’ll never forget is Frida Kahlo’s, “Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird.” I was (and still is) captivated by her imagery, color palette, and the honesty about who she was as a woman, a Latina, and a person who lived to challenge herself artistically.

The painting I’ll be writing about is the 1939 piece titled, “The Two Fridas”. This painting was created shortly after her divorce from Diego Rivera. It depicts the Frida who is heartbroken (left) and the Frida who is independent (right). This piece reflects her loneliness and depression from Rivera, but with their extremely complicated relationship, can’t really say anyone was shocked with the divorce. Regardless, she was in love with him ; mainly with the connection she had with him on a soulful, spiritual level. Along with that, their love of art, culture commonality and evolution of the modern world.

From fridakahlo.org, it states, “In this painting, the two Fridas are holding hands. They both have visible hearts and the heart of the traditional Frida is cut and torn open. The main artery, which comes from the torn heart down to the right hand of the traditional Frida, is cut off by the surgical pincers held in the lap of the traditional Frida. The blood keeps dripping on her white dress and she is in danger of bleeding to death. The stormy sky filled with agitated clouds may reflect Frida’s inner turmoil.”

Knowing about Frida’s background, she has had her fair share of heart-break and trials prior to her divorce. From her bus accident to multiple miscarriages, Frida showed us her feelings through paintings, so the painting of “The Two Fridas” was expected. In this particular piece, we’re getting a glimpse of her trials, pain, depression, loneliness, perception of herself, yet with a sense of independence and acceptance of the situation.

I truly believe the choices we make the how we overcome them is probably one of the best feelings to have as an independent woman. Strong enough to cry, but able to wipe our own tears. Confident enough to know that our bodies aren’t perfect, but able to contently get dressed in the morning. Knowing that everyday isn’t going to be great, but realizing that’s more than fine. With “The Two Fridas”, she conveyed her struggle, yet she would eventually be complacent with herself again. She depicts a moment or insight of what it is to be a woman.

What I’ve learned from Frida is that sometimes you have to hold your own hand through obstacles, heartbreak, and unexpected life events. Being able to pick yourself off from the ground, to live candidly, and to move forward while wearing your heart on your sleeve. Frida was/is the image of ultimate strength, creativity, culture, and a woman who sought change; she’ll be the woman I’ll always admire.

-Michelle

*For more information about Frida Kahlo’s and Diego Rivera’s relationship, feel free to click on the link below.

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http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20171204-frida-kahlo-and-diego-rivera-portrait-of-a-complex-marriage

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Art & Design

The Heartbreak Connection

Hello Readers! Today, I’ll be discussing a piece that is truly iconic: Roy Lichtenstein’s Ohhh…Alright… (found in the Modern Wing at the Art Institute of Chicago).

The 1964 painting is a piece shows a close up image of a woman on the phone as the foreground. It is 36 inches x 38 inches; viewers are larger than it, but it’s large enough to notice the details. Outlines of different figures are highlighted with thick, black lines to create contrast with the colors used. I feel like the black outlines were necessary because the entire piece is so bright and certain elements would have been lost without it.

The first thing I notice were the primary colors. Using bold colors such as red, yellow, blue and black is the equivalent of a having a flashing sign, with huge letters, doused in glitter, that says, “Look at me now!” Yet, it doesn’t feel like a desperate call for attention. I believe he was intentional with his color choices, and it really ties within the piece. Besides the colors, Lichtenstein used a technique called Benday Dot Technique, which is the skill of painting the majority of piece by only using dots. Additionally, it’s a type of technique that is used to create texture that is represented in comic books. Using magna paint, he would use a variety of stencils and use both types of paints to create the dots. For his lines, he used masking tape to create smooth, crisp lines that are definitely conveyed in almost all of his works. 

By doing a lot of research, I found out that Ohhh…Alright… was a part of a series. Lichtenstein created a series of paintings that had romance as the focal point and represented cultural dichotomy between male and female stereotypes that were strongly developed in the 1950s/60s. Although I won’t be analyzing the series, I can only image how much emotion would be evoked if I were to see the pieces collectively. When I first saw the painting at AIC, I automatically had sympathy for this woman I didn’t know. Without any context for the image itself, her emotion that Lichtenstein was able to convey into the painting really spoke to me. The way she held the telephone to the line on her forehead, those subtleties were additions to the feelings the woman in the painting had and would ultimately make viewers want to sympathize or empathize. 

In an essay that can be founded on Christie’s website, it provides the context behind Ohhh… Alright… which states, “Lichtenstein’s series of romance paintings drew on the slightly dated comic books published for the burgeoning Post-War teenage market. The plot line of these stories typically follows a young girl who falls in love with a young man; a serious problem arises to threaten the relationship, and the heroine is briefly devastated before an inevitable happy conclusion…”

Then a realization hit me like a ton of bricks: heartbreak is a feeling most individuals have gone through and it’s something that keeps us connected. It keeps us sympathetic, empathetic, frustrated, desolate, and miserable all at once. It’s a feeling that never really goes away, even if you’ve found your person, because of how much it hurt you back when it happened.  This is why I’ll always say that Lichtenstein was a complete genius for creating art, nonetheless a series, that expressed just that. Ohhh…Alright… continues to represent the “romance culture” of today, and will be stunned with its current relevancy to society. Well, with the exception of women being defined by men. Glad that’s over! *drops mic 

-Michelle

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