Art & Design

Escape From Reality

Dear Readers,

I totally owe you two more blog post about art pieces that currently reside at The Art Institute of Chicago. My lack of writing is a mixture of me trying not to get sick, working, and being more busy than usual. BUT I promise to get back to writing because honestly, I miss it. With that’s said, let’s get to the masterpiece of the day!

I will be writing about the piece that people push and shove a bit to see its entirety. On occasion, even take a selfie with (barf). Georges Seurat’s A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, ca. 1884/86 is about 7 by 10 feet of pure glory. This was Seurat’s largest and most popular painting that showcase people, in a suburban park, enjoying the modern life.  In my opinion, the painting technique (Pointillism/ Divisionism) and colors he used within the entire composition is what makes this piece like nothing else. It was because of A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, Seurat was known for creating a new art genre called, “Neo-Impressionism” (a period that started in 1884 and ended in 1935).

From theartstory.org, it states, “Georges Seurat is chiefly remembered as the pioneer of the Neo-Impressionist technique commonly known as Divisionism, or Pointillism, an approach associated with a softly flickering surface of small dots or strokes of color. His innovations derived from new quasi-scientific theories about color and expression, yet the graceful beauty of his work is explained by the influence of very different sources. Initially, he believed that great modern art would show contemporary life in ways similar to classical art, except that it would use technologically informed techniques…his innovations would be highly influential, shaping the work of artists as diverse as Vincent Van Gogh and the Italian Futurists.”

The question: why is this particular painting extremely popular? I get that it’s a painting that creating its own artistic period and that it uses scientific, out of the box techniques. But why is it the piece that people crowd around?

Three words: escape from reality. It’s a painting where you stand in front of it, and automatically, being intrigued and in awe is an understatement. Seurat adds multiple levels of people, animals and nature, and creates a world we all want to be in. Gazing upon A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, I relate to the moments where I was somewhere, simply enjoying my surroundings. It’s a painting where you’re able to look at the details and wonder how so many colors can fuse into one composition. Seurat captured the joys of leisure and it transfers through. It’s the escape we look for once in a while when things get tough.

Just remember, it’s ok to escape once in a while. The moment when it happens too often, when your escapes become better than reality, take the time to reflect. I found myself years ago where there was nothing I wanted more than to start over. If there was a reset button I was able to press, I would’ve given anything in my possession to have done it. Through reflection, I cut a lot of people out of my life because I figured out that their problems/ habits were sticking to me. Additionally, it was a mixture of growing pains and not knowing how to kick-start my life.

I think it’s a period of life that we all go through at one point in our lives, and that’s ok. It takes a lot of work, hardships, tears, and courage to move forward from certain situations and to continue living the life that we were given. I believe that represents Seurat’s life as well. Although he only lived until he was 31 years old, he had to work extremely hard to find his artistic voice and have courage to stand by his work. His artistic differences made him great and influential, and I will continue to admire his work.

-Michelle

default-1

P.S.- There are 3 dogs, 8 boats, and 48 people painted in A Sunday on La Grande Jatte. Oh, and 1 monkey. Haha! 

 

Standard

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s